ALERT: IMPORTANT COVID-19 UPDATE

As COVID-19 continues to affect the global community, we would like to assure you that Hill Hill Carter remains fully operational. We are taking preventative measures to ensure the safety of our employees while continuing to provide services without disruption to our clients. Click here to learn more about what we’re doing in response to COVID19.

Families First Coronavirus Response Act: As an employer, how do I know if my business is under the 500-employee threshold?

Families First Coronavirus Response Act:  As an employer, how do I know if my business is under the 500-employee threshold and therefore must provide paid sick leave or expanded family and medical leave?
You have fewer than 500 employees if, at the time your employee’s leave is to be taken, you employ fewer than 500 full-time and part-time employees within the United States, which includes any State of the United States, the District of Columbia, or any Territory or possession of the United States. In making this determination, you should include employees on leave; temporary employees who are jointly employed by you and another employer (regardless of whether the jointly-employed employees are maintained on only your or another employer’s payroll); and day laborers supplied by a temporary agency (regardless of whether you are the temporary agency or the client firm if there is a continuing employment relationship). Workers who are independent contractors under the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA), rather than employees, are not considered employees for purposes of the 500-employee threshold.
Typically, a corporation (including its separate establishments or divisions) is considered to be a single employer and its employees must each be counted towards the 500-employee threshold. Where a corporation has an ownership interest in another corporation, the two corporations are separate employers unless they are joint employers under the FLSA with respect to certain employees. If two entities are found to be joint employers, all of their common employees must be counted in determining whether paid sick leave must be provided under the Emergency Paid Sick Leave Act and expanded family and medical leave must be provided under the Emergency Family and Medical Leave Expansion Act.
In general, two or more entities are separate employers unless they meet the integrated employer test under the Family and Medical Leave Act of 1993 (FMLA). If two entities are an integrated employer under the FMLA, then employees of all entities making up the integrated employer will be counted in determining employer coverage for purposes of paid sick leave under the Emergency Paid Sick Leave Act and expanded family and medical leave under the Emergency Family and Medical Leave Expansion Act.
For questions regarding the CARES Act or FFCRA, contact any of our Hill Hill Carter Response Team Members who are available and ready to help businesses looking for assistance in this area.
Please note that the situation surrounding COVID-19 is evolving and that the subject matter discussed may change on a daily basis. Please contact one of Hill Hill Carter’s COVID-19 Response Team Members or your Hill Hill Carter attorney for timely advice.
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